Educate young men on gender and sexuality

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Machismo is not a symbol of manhood

posted Jan 7, 2014 by Isabel Garcia

Progress

Since we received funding, we held a meeting with the leaders of the Youth and Students Advancing Gender Equality (YSAGE) to plan the youth education camp on gender issues, sexuality and prostitution. The planning meeting went through a checklist of preparations, from the target schools and communities where student and youth leaders will be invited, to writing up of formal invitation and application forms, to posting them online up to detailing logistical needs. CATW-AP and YSAGE leaders divided the tasks among themselves.

The youth camp was held on June 1-2, 2013 involving 15 youth leaders who were student council and organizational leaders from their own universities and communities. It also mobilized 11 graduates of previous camps and now leaders of YSAGE, to attend to co-facilitation, as well as food preparation, cooking, dish-washing, preparation of materials and general cleaning up of venue. It was an ideal picture of collective learning through collective work.

Risks and challenges

Some of the youth participants were not able to make it the youth camp at the last minute because of a few of them had work. Even as the education camp was scheduled on a weekend, the potential participants who did not make it to the training were either doing field work for their job, or are rushing requirements for their graduate school.

Up Close

Yves Miel Zuniga, University of the Philippines: The training went way beyond my expectations! Every activity is vital to learning and realization. It was exciting, enlightening, love it! I will start that change and reassessment in myself. I will use my ‘councilship’ to raise awareness.

Alvin Ventura, FEATI University: I learned that women should be respected at all times and machismo doesn't symbolize masculinity. I am so privileged to join this camp.

Next steps

CATW-AP and YSAGE has conducted an evaluation of the past camp. We have also planned for two more camps to happen in December 2013 and in February 2014. This is will involved more men from the remote islands of the Philippines. Towards these camps, similar preparations as in the first camp are underway.

Budget

Line Item Projected budget Amount spent so far

Food and Accommodation of Participants

Labor

Education Materials

Transportation

TOTAL

$3,333 (1/3 of $10,000)

$733 (1/3 of $2,200)

$333 (1/3 of $1,000)

$1,333 (1/3 of $4,000)

$3,333

$700

$350

$1,000

$5,383

Other

Just additional feedback from the participants: This is Mr. Grafia, a participant of the recently held youth camp. I would like to congratulate your group for a very successful program. Also, I would like to extend my deepest gratitude to your group for giving me an opportunity to be a part of such. I promise to uphold the things that I learned and I promise to serve as a role model among others so as to influence them. May you continue your wonderful advocacy and the way how you inspire people.

  • Advocacy
  • Education & training
  • Human trafficking

Educate young men and boys to take a stand against the root causes of commercial sexual exploitation.

Why we care: The demand for the bodies of women and children for commercial sex is a root cause of human trafficking.

How we're solving this: Curb the demand for commercial sex by educating young men and boys about gender based violence.

CATW-Asia Pacific’s (CATW-AP) innovative and visionary young men’s educational camps on gender, sexuality, and prostitution are designed to curb the demand for commercial sex. CATW-AP has developed the first model of its kind designed to educate young men about sexuality, the realities of gender discrimination as manifested in commercial sexual exploitation, and the role men and boys can play in ending the cycle of violence against women. These camps help young men re-imagine masculinity premised on gender equality and nonviolence.
 
In Asia Pacific, graduates of the camps have formed the national advocacy organization, Youth and Students Advancing Gender Equality (YSAGE). In the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, and in India thousands of youth have been educated to take a principled stand against the root causes of commercial sexual exploitation, including the demand for prostitution and pornography, and unequal economic, legal, political and social conditions.
 
Your support will allow for these workshops to be implemented with young men in remote areas of the Philippines (Visayas and in Mindanao) where they are needed most. This funding would allow for youth leaders to expand the reach of this model and educate their communities and schools to curb the vulnerability of women and children to commercial sexual exploitation.

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