Well brings clean water, new hope to 300 people

  • A school and workshop empower young Nepalese girls.  
    Asia and Pacific
     
     
     
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  • For less than two dollars, a woman and her future newb...
    Asia and Pacific
     
     
    Mother
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    Woman
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    $10,115 of 14,600 needed 5supporters
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Days To Go
122
Supporters
$11,562
Raised of $11,542 Needed
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1 year impact report

We completed well construction - bringing safe water to 200 people in Ethiopia.

This project was funded in part with matching contributions from Johnson & Johnson.
– Thank you!
Impact for girls & women

According to census data in the area, approximately 57% percent of the population is female (Central Statistical Agency Report, 2008).

Estimated girls & women affected

114

Broader impact

We brought 200 people reliable access to safe water in Awlie, Ethiopia. However, the average number of total people empowered with access to safe water in the 12 communities we worked in is currently at 325.

Estimated community members affected

325

Community gains acess to safe water and sanitation

One year ago, you chose to support the construction of a well in Awlie, in Ethiopia’s Ganta-Afeshum Wereda. With your support, Water.org and its local partner, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), completed the well construction, bringing 200 people reliable access to safe water. Thanks to your support, women and children in this area no longer have to walk two or more hours each day across steep, rugged terrain to collect water from polluted rivers. As a result, local residents are safer and have more time to work, rest, or go to school.

In addition to this new water point, Water.org established and trained a gender-balanced, six-person committee on how to maintain the water point. This training included: hand pump maintenance, understanding the spare parts and their uses, and how to repair the pump.

Water.org and Relief Society of Tigray also delivered hygiene and sanitation education training to community members, who in turn focused on awareness-raising within the community on topics including:

  • Using clean cups that have been washed; o Hand-washing before meals and after going to the bathroom;
  • Keeping livestock separate from the home and maintaining a clean living space; and
  • Other barriers to improving sanitation and protecting safe water points as identified by the participants.

Get personal

Girmawit Alema, 15, used to spend hours collecting water for her family, often carrying back water in the dark and rarely able to transport enough for drinking and cooking. “Before the [well] we were suffering a lot in getting water….I usually used to collect only one jerry can (20 liters) per day because it is too far to fetch more than once. As a result the amount of water I used to collect every day was very limited and was always not enough,” she said.

Risks and challenges

The population of Awlie is around 200 people, so the size of the community reached with this well is smaller than originally estimated. However, the average number of people empowered with access to safe water in the 12 communities we worked in is currently at 325. And, certainly the positive impact of these activities on each community is clear regardless of the population size. We believe that all people deserve access to safe water, no matter the size of a person’s town, family, or income, and our team is proud to have been able to help the people of Awlie with your support.

What we’ve learned

While the program in Awlie went smoothly, some of the other locations of this broader program had to be adjusted once full site surveys were completed to ensure locations selected would provide the best resources for the communities and not dry up. While initial surveys identify potential sites, those locations sometimes need to change when explored fully. This program reinforced the importance of being flexible during the implementation, scheduling time for full site evaluations, and making contingency plans.

Next steps

All activities of this program have been completed successfully. Thank you to everyone for your support! We are continuing its work in Ethiopia through the launch of WaterCredit. WaterCredit puts microfinance tools to work in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector. In addition, we will be launching a new community well program with the Organization for Rehabilitation and Development in Amhara later this year.

Budget

All funding has been spent to date and all activities executed.

Line Items

Projected budget

Amount spent so far

Program activities

Monitoring and evaluation

Admin and governance

$8,195

$2,193

$1,154

$8,195

$2,193

$1,154

Further reading

Other stories and updates about our work in Ethiopia are available here.

90 Day Report

Ensure women's sustainable access to water and sanitation

posted Sep 25, 2013 by Alyssa Tartaglione

With support from Catapult and matching funds from Johnson & Johnson, Water.org and its local partner, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST), have completed construction of a well in the Ganta-Afeshum Wereda of Ethiopia. In this area, women and children often walk two or more hours each day across steep, rugged terrain to collect water from polluted rivers. Most families are forced to survive on a strict ration of about five liters of water per day.

Water.org and REST have successfully built a community well in this area, bringing 300 people reliable access to safe water. As a result, local residents, including women and children who are primarily tasked with gathering water, are safer and have more time to work, rest, or go to school. In addition to this new water point, Water.org established and trained a gender-balanced, six-person water and sanitation committee on how to maintain the water point. This training included hand pump maintenance, understanding the spare parts and their uses, and how to repair the pump. Water.org and REST also delivered hygiene and sanitation education training to community members, who in turn focused on awareness-raising within the community on topics including:

  • Using clean cups that have been washed
  • Hand-washing before meals & after using the bathroom
  • Keeping livestock separate from the home & maintaining a clean living space
  • Other barriers to improving sanitation and protecting safe water points as identified by participants

Risks and challenges

The main challenge faced in this project was identifying the best location for the well. For the location, the original target area in Tselim Ela proved to be too dry. As a result, a new location in the village of Endagewergis was selected. While initial surveys identify potential sites, those locations sometimes need to change when explored fully. This program reinforced the importance of being flexible during the implementation, scheduling time for full site evaluations, and making contingency plans.

Get personal

Water = Education for Diana and Samrawit

Diana and Samrawit are young girls living in the mountainous village of Haben Tabia. The two girls, in grades 7 and 8 respectively, used to often miss classes because they had to collect water for their families. Without a water source in their village, they had to walk almost an hour each day to get unsafe water in a nearby village. Then REST and Water.org installed a water connection in their village. Now they walk less than 400 meters to get safe water for their families. This means the girls miss less school, have more time to study, and are less likely to be victims of violence while out walking alone. “We collect water whenever we want and do not even think about collecting water since it is very near to our houses. This helps us a lot in following our education properly and obtaining a good result in our class,” one of the girls said. “This allows us to have more time to help our parents doing house chores and study as well.”

Next steps

All activities have been completed successfully, thank you to everyone for your support!

Budget

All funding has been spent to date and all activities executed.

Additional resources

Other stories and updates about our work in Ethiopia are available here: http://water.org/recent-posts/?country=ET&media=

  • Food & water

Tigray is one of the most drought prone regions in Ethiopia. Less than half of the people living there can access clean water.

Why we care: In Tigray, women and children often walk two or more hours each day across rugged terrain to collect water from polluted rivers for their families.

How we’re solving this: Water.org has launched a new program with a local partner, the Relief Society of Tigray (REST) to build community wells in the area.

Water.org began working in Ethiopia in 2004. Since then, it has worked successfully with local communities, reaching more than 100,000 people with access to safe water, health and hygiene education, and sanitary toilets.

Your support for this project will go toward building and maintaining one community well in the community of Tselim Ela. Currently, women and children are walking two hours round-trip to collect unsafe water from a river. This project will:

  • Serve approximately 300 people, giving them reliable access to safe water
  • Establish and train a six-person committee to serve as the primary managers and promote health and sanitation education
  • Provide hygiene and sanitation education to two health extension workers
  • Conduct surveys and focus groups pre- and post- program intervention stages to measure program impacts

The community will contribute to the program through the provision of labor, construction materials, well user fees, and management of the completed water points. Water.org will work with local water and health government offices to support the communities once the project ends and to monitor village health. Water-quality tests will also be completed at the site.

Budget

  • Program activities (construction of water systems, community mobilization, training, and hygiene education): $8,195
  • Monitoring and evaluation: $2,193
  • Water.org admin and governance: $1,154 
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